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Drugs results:

Yasmin

Yasmin

Yasmin, also called Drospirenone and Ethinyl Estradiol, is one of a group of birth control pills that generally contain two types of hormones, estrogens and progestins. When taken correctly, Yasmin is an effective contraceptive that stops a woman's egg fr more...

Cephalosporin

Cephalosporin

Cephalexin is an antibiotic in a class of drugs called cephalosporins that works by fighting bacteria in the body. This medicine is used to treat many different types of bacterial infections such as respiratory tract infections (bronchitis, tonsillitis, e more...

Clarithromycin tablets

Clarithromycin

Clarithromycin is in a class of drugs called macrolide antibiotics. It kills bacteria in your body also termed as a bactericidal drug. It is used to treat many different types of bacterial infections such as bronchitis, pneumonia, sinusitis, tonsillitis a more...

Alesse 28 tablets

Alesse 28

Alesse-28, also known as Levonorgestrel and Ethinyl Estradiol, is one of a group of drugs called Oral Contraceptives, and are used to prevent pregnancy when taken properly. Alesse contains two types of hormones, estrogens and progestins, and stop a woman more...

Femara tablet

Femara

Femara, also called Letrozole, is used to treat certain types of breast cancer in women. Hormones that occur naturally in the body can increase the growth of some breast cancers. Femara works by decreasing the amounts of these hormones in the body. This m more...

Diseases results:

Hormones
Bacterial infection
Pharyngitis
Birth control
Breast cancer
Glaucoma
Angina
Alzheimers disease
Reduce cholesterol
Arthritis

Articles results:

UW-Madison Researchers Clear Way To Stronger Glass
Look at your window - not out it, but at it. Though the window glass looks clear, if you could peer inside the pane you would see a surprising molecular mess, with tiny particles jumbled together any which way.Now, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a new glass-making technique that eliminates some of that mess.


Unusually Stable Glasses May Benefit Drugs, Coatings
Just spray and chill. That sums up a new approach to making remarkably stable glassy materials from organic (carbon-containing) molecules that could lead to novel coatings and to improvements in drug delivery. The processing advance is reported in this week's issue of Science* by scientists from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research (NCNR).


UCSF Pharmacy School Receives Major Grant From Amgen Foundation For Medicare Part D Outreach
The UCSF School of Pharmacy has received a $3.7 million grant from the Amgen Foundation to fund an innovative program that will help underserved elderly Californians learn about and select from Medicare prescription drug plans. There currently are more than 70 of these drug plans in the state, most of which are Medicare Part D plans.


Henry Ford Health System To Ban Gifts From Pharmaceutical Companies To Physicians
The Detroit-based Henry Ford Health System beginning Jan. 1, 2007, will ban no-cost lunches, gifts and other incentives to physicians from medical equipment and pharmaceutical company representatives, the AP/Fort Worth Star-Telegram reports.


Annual Research, Development Spending By Pharmaceutical Industry Increased By 147% From 1993 Through 2004, But 'Productivity' Has Been 'Declining,' GA
Pharmaceutical companies are submitting fewer drug applications to FDA while spending more money to develop new drugs, according to a report released Tuesday by the Government Accountability Office, the Washington Post reports.




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